Violence in the sports community

 
My relationship with...

If I realize I’m having a lot of negative issues when practising my sport, I should consult…

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Violence in the sports community

Understanding what violence is in the sports community, and the forms it can take.

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Physical contact

Physical contact in a sports environment can be appropriate and beneficial when it’s used to…

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Sexual consent

“The agreement given to a sexual partner at the moment the partners take part in sexual activities.”

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Sports initiation rituals

Remember that abusive rituals are never acceptable, no matter the context!

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Corporal punishment

You shoud know that the law forbids the people who oversee you in your sport to use corporal punishment.

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Mental strength

Some positive techniques to encourage and develop your mental strength.

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Rights and responsibilities

“As an underage athlete, you have the right to be treated at all times… ”


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In case of rumours or suspicions

In cases of rumours or suspicions related to your organization’s code of ethics or harassment policy

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Intervention procedures

Any person providing services to children or teenagers bears the responsibility to intervene.

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If a person has valid reasons to believe an underage person is in danger, that person is legally obligated to report it to the Director of Youth Protection (DYP)[E]
 
In what circumstances is a child considered in danger?
    • The child is abandoned.
    • The child is neglected.
    • The child is subjected to psychological ill-treatment.
    • The child is subjected to sexual abuse or there is a serious risk of sexual abuse.
    • The child is subjected to physical abuse or there is a serious risk of physical abuse.
    • The child displays serious behavioural problems.
 
Youth Protection Act, excerpts
 
Article 39: Every professional who, by the very nature of his profession, provides care or any other form of assistance to children and who, in the practice of his profession, has reasonable grounds to believe that the security or development of a child is or may be considered to be in danger within the meaning of section 38 or 38.1, must bring the situation to the attention of the director without delay. The same obligation is incumbent upon any employee of an institution, any teacher, any person working in a childcare establishment or any policeman who, in the performance of his duties, has reasonable grounds to believe that the security or development of a child is or may be considered to be in danger within the meaning of the said provisions.
 
Mandatory reporting: Any person, other than a person referred to in the first paragraph, who has reasonable grounds to believe that the security or development of a child is considered to be in danger within the meaning of subparagraphs d and e of the second paragraph of section 38 must bring the situation to the attention of the director without delay.

Discretionary reporting: Any person, other than a person referred to in the first paragraph, who has reasonable grounds to believe that the security or development of a child is or may be considered to be in danger within the meaning of subparagraph a, b, c or f of the second paragraph of section 38 or within the meaning of section 38.1 may bring the situation to the attention of the director.
 
Professional secrecy: The first, second and fourth paragraphs apply even to persons who are bound by professional secrecy, except to advocates or notaries who, in the practice of their profession, receive information concerning a situation described in section 38 or 38.1.